St. Turibius

Turibius3A zealous maintainer of ecclesiastical discipline, and defender of the faith against the Priscillianist heresy in Spain; in which his endeavors were seconded by St. Leo the Great, as appears by his letter to St. Turibius. His predecessor, Dictinius, had the misfortune to fall into the heresy of the Priscillianists; but was never deposed, as the historian Quesnel mistakes, and died about the year 420, as is clear from the writings St. Austin. St. Turibins died about the year 460, and is named in the Roman Martyrology on this day.

(Source: Butler’s Lives of the Saints)

St. Catherine of Sweden

st-catherine-of-swedenST. CATHARINE was daughter of Ulpho, Prince of Nericia in Sweden, and of St. Bridget. The love of God seemed almost to prevent in her the use of her reason. At seven years of age she was placed in the nunnery of Risburgh, and educated in piety under the care of the holy abbess of that house. Being very beautiful, she was, by her father, contracted in marriage to Egard, a young nobleman of great virtue; but the virgin persuaded him to join with her in making a mutual vow of perpetual chastity. Continue reading

St. Paul of Narbonne

19926-basilica-st-paul-serge-narbonneSt. Gregory of Tours informs us, that he was sent with other preachers from Rome to plant the faith in Gaul. St. Saturninus of Thoulouse, and St. Dionysius of Paris, were crowned with martyrdom: but St. Paul of Narbonne, St. Trophimus of Arles, St. Martial of Limoges, and St. Gatian of Tours, after having founded those churches, amidst many dangers, departed in peace. Prudentius says, that the name of Paul had rendered the city of Narbonne illustrious.

(Source: Butler’s Lives of the Saints)