St. Peter, Apostle

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sotd thumbnailAs a rule, whenever St. Paul has a feast day, St. Peter is, likewise, commemorated.  Later in the year, on June 29, we will again remember these two apostles with the Feast of the Saints Peter and Paul.  Just as they were joined in life in the heroic work of our Lord, joined in receiving the crown of martyrdom on the same day, and joined in honor in heaven, it is tradition that the two Founders of the Roman Church can never be divided.

(Source: Interview with Fr. Martin Skierka)

The Conversion of St. Paul the Apostle; Station at St. Paul

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sotd thumbnailSince the eight century the feast of the conversion of St. Paul has been set apart by the Church to return thanks to almighty God for His act of grace in bringing the future apostle to the Faith.  At on time the feast was even a holy day of obligation.  After the miracle of Christ’s Resurrection no other wonder in the history of the early Church is a stronger proof of the divine origin of Christianity than the conversion of St. Paul.

(Source: Fr. Lasance, The New Roman Missal)