Sts. Vincent and Anastasius, Martyr; Station at the Vatican at the Oratory in Jerusalem and at the Monastery Ad Aquas Salvias on the Ostian Way

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sotd thumbnailThese two martyrs also had each the honor of a separate stational Mass at Rome.  St. Vincent, a Spanish deacon, suffered death for the Faith under Diocletian, in the year 300.  St. Anastasius, a native of Persia, was also put to death for being a Christian.  The feasts of these two are both celebrated on the same day.  The example of the heroic fortitude of the martyrs who in the hope of the resurrection, rather than betray the Faith, seek no escape from death, is, indeed, necessary in our days when a sentimental pietistic feeling threatens to replace in the conscience of many the practical profession of the Christian life.

 (Source: Fr. Lasance, The New Roman Missal)