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This Society is focused on  fostering, reinforcing and promoting traditional Catholic principles in society. Each day on this page, you’ll find the Saints of the Day as reflected in the traditional calendar of the Roman Catholic Church.  Read more about our mission and beliefs here.

Two Columns

On May 30, 1862, Don Bosco narrated the following dream. It concerns the battles of the Church against many adversaries, the sufferings of the Pope and the final triumph through devotion to the Holy Eucharist and to Mary, Help of Christians.

The painting below, created by Matthew Brooks, is used with permission. It depicts one of the forty dreams of St. John Bosco. In it, two ships battled in a violent sea. Within this depiction is a stunning amount of symbolism.

bosco1-larger-image

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St. Thecla, Virgin, Martyr.

ST. THECLA is one of the most ancient, as she is one of the most illustrious, Saints in the calendar of the Church. It was at Iconium that St. Paul met St. Thecla, and kindled the love of virginity in her heart. She had been promised in marriage to a young man who was rich and generous. But at the Apostle’s words she died to the thought of earthly espousals; she forgot her beauty; she was deaf to her parents threats, and at the first opportunity she fled from a luxurious home and followed St. Paul. The rage of her parents and of her intended spouse followed hard upon her; and the Roman power did its worst against the virgin whom Christ had chosen for His own. She was stripped and placed in the public theatre; but her innocence shrouded her like a garment. Then the lions were let loose against her; they fell crouching at her feet, and licked them as if in veneration. Even fire could not harm her. Torment after torment was inflicted upon her without effect, till at last her Spouse spoke the word and called her to Himself, with the double crown of virginity and martyrdom on her head.

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St. Maurice and Companions

9_22_mauriceSt. Maurice was an officer of the Theban legion, a body of about 6000 men. These soldiers were Christians and loyal to their emperor and to God. They refused to sacrifice to the heathen gods and were put to the sword, in 286, by Maximian, the colleague of Diocletian, unresistingly giving their lives for the Faith.

(Source: The New Roman Missal, Rev. F. X. Lasance)