Welcome!

This Society is focused on  fostering, reinforcing and promoting traditional Catholic principles in society. Each day on this page, you’ll find the Saints of the Day as reflected in the traditional calendar of the Roman Catholic Church.  Read more about our mission and beliefs here.

Two Columns

On May 30, 1862, Don Bosco narrated the following dream. It concerns the battles of the Church against many adversaries, the sufferings of the Pope and the final triumph through devotion to the Holy Eucharist and to Mary, Help of Christians.

The painting below, created by Matthew Brooks, is used with permission. It depicts one of the forty dreams of St. John Bosco. In it, two ships battled in a violent sea. Within this depiction is a stunning amount of symbolism.

bosco1-larger-image

Continue reading

Sts. Soter and Caius

 

ST. SOTER was raised to the papacy upon the death of St. Anicetus, in 173. By the sweetness of his discourses he comforted all persons with the tenderness of a father, and assisted the indigent with liberal alms, especially those who suffered for the faith. He liberally extended his charities, according to the custom of his predecessors, to remote churches, particularly to that of Corinth, to which he addressed an excellent letter, as St. Dionysius of Corinth testifies in his letter of thanks, who adds that his letter was found worthy to be read for their edification on Sundays at their assemblies to celebrate the divine mysteries, together with the letter of St. Clement, pope. St. Soter vigorously opposed the heresy of Montanus, and governed the Church to the year 177.

(Source:  Butler’s Lives of the Saints)

St. Anselm

ANSELM was a native of Piedmont. When a boy of fifteen, being forbidden to enter religion, he for a while lost his fervor, left his home, and went to various schools in France. At length his vocation revived, and he became a monk at Bec in Normandy. The fame of his sanctity in this cloister led William Rufus, when dangerously ill, to take him for his confessor, and to name him to the vacant see of Canterbury. Now began the strife of Anselm’s life. With new health the king relapsed into his former sins, plundered the Church lands, scorned the archbishop’s rebukes, and forbade him to go to Rome for the pallium. Anselm went, and returned only to enter into a more bitter strife with William’s successor, Henry I. Continue reading

St. Agnes of Monte Pulciano

This holy virgin was a native of Monte Pulciano, in Tuscany. She had scarce attained to the use of reason, when she conceived an extraordinary relish and ardor for prayer, and in her infancy often spent whole hours in reciting the Our Father and Hail Mary, on her knees, in some private corner of a chamber.

At nine years of age she was placed by her parents in a convent of Sackins, of the order of St. Francis, so called from their habit, or at least their scapular, being made of sackcloth. Agnes, in so tender an age, was a model of all virtues to this austere community: and she renounced the world, though of a plentiful fortune, being sensible of its dangers before she knew what it was to enjoy it. Continue reading