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This Society is focused on  fostering, reinforcing and promoting traditional Catholic principles in society. Each day on this page, you’ll find the Saints of the Day as reflected in the traditional calendar of the Roman Catholic Church.  Read more about our mission and beliefs here.

Two Columns

On May 30, 1862, Don Bosco narrated the following dream. It concerns the battles of the Church against many adversaries, the sufferings of the Pope and the final triumph through devotion to the Holy Eucharist and to Mary, Help of Christians.

The painting below, created by Matthew Brooks, is used with permission. It depicts one of the forty dreams of St. John Bosco. In it, two ships battled in a violent sea. Within this depiction is a stunning amount of symbolism.

bosco1-larger-image

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St. Catherine of Sweden

st-catherine-of-swedenST. CATHARINE was daughter of Ulpho, Prince of Nericia in Sweden, and of St. Bridget. The love of God seemed almost to prevent in her the use of her reason. At seven years of age she was placed in the nunnery of Risburgh, and educated in piety under the care of the holy abbess of that house. Being very beautiful, she was, by her father, contracted in marriage to Egard, a young nobleman of great virtue; but the virgin persuaded him to join with her in making a mutual vow of perpetual chastity. Continue reading

St. Paul of Narbonne

19926-basilica-st-paul-serge-narbonneSt. Gregory of Tours informs us, that he was sent with other preachers from Rome to plant the faith in Gaul. St. Saturninus of Thoulouse, and St. Dionysius of Paris, were crowned with martyrdom: but St. Paul of Narbonne, St. Trophimus of Arles, St. Martial of Limoges, and St. Gatian of Tours, after having founded those churches, amidst many dangers, departed in peace. Prudentius says, that the name of Paul had rendered the city of Narbonne illustrious.

(Source: Butler’s Lives of the Saints)

St. Isidore the Farmer

515isidore10It is a misfortune which deserves to be lamented with floods of tears, the ignorance, obstinacy, and vice should so often taint a country life, the state which of all others is most necessary and important to the world; the most conformable to a human condition and to nature, the state which was sanctified by the example of the primitive holy patriarchs, and which affords the most favorable opportunities for the perfect practice of every virtue and Christian duty. What advantageous helps to piety did the ancient hermits seek in the deserts, which the circumstances of a country laborer do not offer? The life of St. Isidore is a most sensible proof of this assertion. Continue reading